Things we'll have to do after Brexit, No. 463
Started by Scrotnig, 4th March 2019 23:38 in Brexit Forum

  1. #21 | 2106789
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    Default Re: Things we'll have to do after Brexit, No. 463

    Dordie
    We had dried egg, dried Milk, Spam.
    What a brilliant advert for Brexit.

    Had I realised that after Brexit we'd be forced to go back to eating dried egg, dried milk and Spam, I would have voted Leave in a heartbeat.
    Liked by: Fork Me


  2. #22 | 2106790
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    Default Re: Things we'll have to do after Brexit, No. 463

    Chris Mitchell
    What a brilliant advert for Brexit.

    Had I realised that after Brexit we'd be forced to go back to eating dried egg, dried milk and Spam, I would have voted Leave in a heartbeat.
    I don't support Theresa May.....you appear to dote on her.....Strange!
    The European Union is Nazism under a new banner.
    Perrin is right about Cameron, on everything else he is wrong.
    Fork Me is a decent type, pity he's such a twat!

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    Default Re: Things we'll have to do after Brexit, No. 463

    Oh, I know what I forgot....
    The chlorinated chicken!

  4. #24 | 2106808
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    Default Re: Things we'll have to do after Brexit, No. 463

    Lord Ponsonby
    Oh, I know what I forgot....
    The chlorinated chicken!
    Never mind, you'll be able to buy some in April.

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    Default Re: Things we'll have to do after Brexit, No. 463

    Scrotnig

    Why can't we eat British chicken, British beef, British pork, and so on? It's not as if there's any sort of shortage

    We could include Irish in that as well, they will happily trade with us, with our without the EU. Although should they not wish to do so, or not be able to due to still being in the EU, then bollox to them as well.
    Some of us already do!

    The farm shop from where I prefer to buy my vegs is owned and run by the farmer and his family. The crops are grown within 5 miles of the shop - no air miles - just perfectly fresh - seasonal vegs.

    The Butcher from whom I buy my meat and poultry uses only locally (Yorkshire) bred/grown produce. Another butcher nearby makes his own sausages, black pudding, haslet etc., dry cures his own bacon (no nitrate/water slime), and also makes delicious pies.

    The Fishmonger in town from whom I buy fresh fish/shellfish/fish cakes etc., - buys his fish directly from the fishermen at Whitby. I do buy Mussels from Sainsbury's occasionally but they are clearly marked as UK sourced.

    Most of my cheese is produced in the dairy at Hawes or comes from Wales - bought on-line.. All of it is UK produced.

    The butter I use comes from Ireland - from grass fed herds which are not injected with antibiotics or growth hormones.

    We are still lucky enough to have a milkman in the area -so my milk arrives in proper glass bottles from a dairy less than 15 miles from my home. He also delivers eggs - from a Brown Burford flock which are free range and salmonella free.

    Fruit - UK produced seasonal apples, pears and berries.

    I put my hands up to using 'foreign' bananas, lemons, limes and oranges - only because they cannot be home grown - but I am watchful about country of origin.

    I will not buy anything french or american.

    You see - a good 90% of my food is not only UK produce but is also Yorkshire produce!

    UK is perfectly capable of producing it's own food - maybe not enough to be entirely self sufficient - but if more people stuck to buying UK stuff surely that would change?
    Liked by: Bill. MC, sphinx


  6. #26 | 2106824
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    Default Re: Things we'll have to do after Brexit, No. 463

    Yorkshire is the best bit of England
    Always remember to be kind, bright, and happy

  7. #27 | 2106833
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    Default Re: Things we'll have to do after Brexit, No. 463

    Nice Fred
    Yorkshire is the best bit of England
    Not the part of it you came from.
    Liked by: Joe 90


  8. #28 | 2106837
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    Default Re: Things we'll have to do after Brexit, No. 463

    Lord Ponsonby
    Not the part of it you came from.
    It's so much better now I've left
    Always remember to be kind, bright, and happy

  9. #29 | 2106838
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    Default Re: Things we'll have to do after Brexit, No. 463

    Luna
    Some of us already do!

    The farm shop from where I prefer to buy my vegs is owned and run by the farmer and his family. The crops are grown within 5 miles of the shop - no air miles - just perfectly fresh - seasonal vegs.

    The Butcher from whom I buy my meat and poultry uses only locally (Yorkshire) bred/grown produce. Another butcher nearby makes his own sausages, black pudding, haslet etc., dry cures his own bacon (no nitrate/water slime), and also makes delicious pies.

    The Fishmonger in town from whom I buy fresh fish/shellfish/fish cakes etc., - buys his fish directly from the fishermen at Whitby. I do buy Mussels from Sainsbury's occasionally but they are clearly marked as UK sourced.

    Most of my cheese is produced in the dairy at Hawes or comes from Wales - bought on-line.. All of it is UK produced.

    The butter I use comes from Ireland - from grass fed herds which are not injected with antibiotics or growth hormones.

    We are still lucky enough to have a milkman in the area -so my milk arrives in proper glass bottles from a dairy less than 15 miles from my home. He also delivers eggs - from a Brown Burford flock which are free range and salmonella free.

    Fruit - UK produced seasonal apples, pears and berries.

    I put my hands up to using 'foreign' bananas, lemons, limes and oranges - only because they cannot be home grown - but I am watchful about country of origin.

    I will not buy anything french or american.

    You see - a good 90% of my food is not only UK produce but is also Yorkshire produce!

    UK is perfectly capable of producing it's own food - maybe not enough to be entirely self sufficient - but if more people stuck to buying UK stuff surely that would change?
    Most of the produce I buy is local. However, you and I are lucky enough to be able to have the resources to do that. If you're working twelve hour shifts in a care home on minimum wage, you probably can't afford to buy a decent local chicken from a farm or local sausages, and you probably don't have time between juggling your shifts and part-time jobs to cook a meal from scratch, either. In those cases, you're probably going to buy some cheap frozen chicken bits from a cheap supermarket, and probably don't spend too long looking at the country of origin. Under those circumstances, it's also quite possible that your only option for lunch will be a quick meal at the canteen - and again, you won't have any say in where the chicken in your lunchtime casserole comes from.

    As Scrot says, we do have Irish beef too - and yes, they will continue to trade with us so long as our food standards and theirs match, which they do currently and will continue to do so for a while after Brexit. BUT - and it's a really big but - if we want to strike our own trade deals, such as with the US, we will have to accept using antibiotics and chlorine washes to do a deal, at which point we won't be able to trade with Ireland in the same way we do now. Our standards will be lower, and there will need to be border checks. The only way of maintaining free trade with Ireland is to adhere to EU standards, which rather negates the point of Brexit.

    So yes - you and I have the luxury of buying local. A lot of people don't.

  10. #30 | 2106842
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    Default Re: Things we'll have to do after Brexit, No. 463

    Chris Mitchell
    Most of the produce I buy is local. However, you and I are lucky enough to be able to have the resources to do that. If you're working twelve hour shifts in a care home on minimum wage, you probably can't afford to buy a decent local chicken from a farm or local sausages, and you probably don't have time between juggling your shifts and part-time jobs to cook a meal from scratch, either. In those cases, you're probably going to buy some cheap frozen chicken bits from a cheap supermarket, and probably don't spend too long looking at the country of origin. Under those circumstances, it's also quite possible that your only option for lunch will be a quick meal at the canteen - and again, you won't have any say in where the chicken in your lunchtime casserole comes from.

    As Scrot says, we do have Irish beef too - and yes, they will continue to trade with us so long as our food standards and theirs match, which they do currently and will continue to do so for a while after Brexit. BUT - and it's a really big but - if we want to strike our own trade deals, such as with the US, we will have to accept using antibiotics and chlorine washes to do a deal, at which point we won't be able to trade with Ireland in the same way we do now. Our standards will be lower, and there will need to be border checks. The only way of maintaining free trade with Ireland is to adhere to EU standards, which rather negates the point of Brexit.

    So yes - you and I have the luxury of buying local. A lot of people don't.
    I have no problem adhering to EU standards, indeed I think itís a good idea.

    I voted leave to prevent this country being ruled by unelected foreigners.

    We could remain in the single market and customs union, thus retaining the trading agreements and standards, while not being ruled by an EU federal state. I accept we also lose influence on those rules, but actually a lot of them were driven by us in the first place, especially on food standards where we once led the world.
    .
    Liked by: Bill. MC, sphinx


 


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