The Viking Pagan Influence in Ireland
Started by Bill. MC, 29th November 2018 20:17 in Paganism & Divinatory Arts

  1. #1 | 2095913
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    Default The Viking Pagan Influence in Ireland

    Recent research has found that the Vikings had a greater genetic influence upon the Irish than previously thought.

    Researchers at Trinity College Dublin believe that Viking and Norman invasions of Ireland may have made a more striking impression on the DNA breakup of the country than previously thought.

    In January 2018 they also discovered 23 new genetic clusters in Ireland not previously identified, leading to the belief that we may have far more Viking and Norman ancestry than previously evidenced.

    https://www.irishcentral.com/roots/a...RpiqI.facebook

    The Gallowglass were a powerful tribe of Gaelic speaking Vikings originally, from Norway who established themselves on the Western fringes of NW Britain, Isle of Mann and Eastern Ireland. There were also many Danish Vikings in Ireland and they eventually had a big battle during the 10th century for control of Ireland. The Danes won and the Gaelic speaking Norweagians fled to mainland Britain settling in SW Scotland and NW England.

    The Norman invasion of Ireland resulted in the native Irish abondoning their Celtic Christianity for Roman Catholicism.

    So I wonder how many of the native Irish reverted back to paganism after the Viking invasions? Here is an interesting archaeologic discovery:
    http://irisharchaeology.ie/2013/07/t...viking-dublin/

    It was found near Dublin and is called Thor’s Wood, which maybe a sacred grove. Sacred groves were important to the Celtic druids and also to Norse pagan religious practice and were normally referred to as lundr in Old Norse. These sites appear to have been relatively common and were often incorporated in later Scandinavian place-names. For example rs lundr (Thor’s Grove) is a common place-name in Denmark.

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    Default Re: The Viking Pagan Influence in Ireland

    That is an interesting link - thank you Bill.
    Liked by: Bill. MC


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    Default Re: The Viking Pagan Influence in Ireland

    Absolutely. Dublin was a Viking settlement.

    I have an Irish friend who is fiercely proud of being a Celt. She has a Danish boyfriend, Paul. A few years ago, they did a lot of DNA testing on Irish people and - as she so eloquently put it - "it turns out we're all fucking Vikings!"

    "Paul fucking loved that, I can tell you!"
    Liked by: Bill. MC


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    Default Re: The Viking Pagan Influence in Ireland

    I am not Surprised at this at the least.

    Our Isle of Mann has a lot of Viking Settlement Ruins that have been Excavated mostly during WW2 when a Germany Archaeologist got Interned there.


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  5. #5 | 2095985
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    Default Re: The Viking Pagan Influence in Ireland

    Chris Mitchell
    Absolutely. Dublin was a Viking settlement.

    I have an Irish friend who is fiercely proud of being a Celt. She has a Danish boyfriend, Paul. A few years ago, they did a lot of DNA testing on Irish people and - as she so eloquently put it - "it turns out we're all fucking Vikings!"

    "Paul fucking loved that, I can tell you!"
    You clearly mix with ladies of poor breeding.
    Liked by: sphinx


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    Default Re: The Viking Pagan Influence in Ireland

    TheDruid 3X3
    I am not Surprised at this at the least.

    Our Isle of Mann has a lot of Viking Settlement Ruins that have been Excavated mostly during WW2 when a Germany Archaeologist got Interned there.


    3X3
    The reason why I started this thread was to discuss to what extent the Viking invasions of the British Isle had WRT reviving paganism.

    Chritianity had been established for about 300 prior to Viking invasions. In the north of England and the north of Scotland it had only been established for about 200 years. The kngdom of Mercia was ruled by a pagan King Penda during the 7th century AD.

    So in the early years of Christianity wthin the British Isles its foundation must have been weak and thus an invasion by pagans such as Vikings must have nearly wiped it out.
    Liked by: Chris Mitchell


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    Default Re: The Viking Pagan Influence in Ireland

    Lord Ponsonby
    You clearly mix with ladies of poor breeding.
    My friend doesn't pull her punches, but she's an academic, so isn't bound by the petty lower middle class mores that restrict the likes of you.
    Liked by: Plutonium, sphinx


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    Default Re: The Viking Pagan Influence in Ireland

    Bill. MC
    The reason why I started this thread was to discuss to what extent the Viking invasions of the British Isle had WRT reviving paganism.

    Chritianity had been established for about 300 prior to Viking invasions. In the north of England and the north of Scotland it had only been established for about 200 years. The kngdom of Mercia was ruled by a pagan King Penda during the 7th century AD.

    So in the early years of Christianity wthin the British Isles its foundation must have been weak and thus an invasion by pagans such as Vikings must have nearly wiped it out.
    It nearly did. I think the first Viking invasion was at Lindisfarne, where they ransacked the monastery and murdered a lot of monks. The Anglo-Saxon kingdoms were reasonably wealthy and tolerant of other religions, so even the pagan rulers weren't a threat to Christians. Those Christians certainly were under threat from Vikings, though.

    But I'm not sure that religion was the key thing. The Vikings came to plunder initially, but then they realised there were much richer pickings in the British Isles than what they could get from occasional raids. Settling here and establishing a system of extortion was much more profitable, and (presumably for expediency) a lot of Vikings converted to Christianity. By the time of Cnut in the 11th century, we had a king of Viking ancestry, but a Christian one. Meanwhile, other Christianised Vikings were running northern France, which was now named after them - the term "Normans" just means "Norse men".
    Liked by: Bill. MC, sphinx


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    Default Re: The Viking Pagan Influence in Ireland

    I once saw some YouTube that pointed out that the Viking actually ventured into the Mediterranean and there are Artifacts as far as Greece found that are Viking.


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    Default Re: The Viking Pagan Influence in Ireland

    TheDruid 3X3
    I once saw some YouTube that pointed out that the Viking actually ventured into the Mediterranean and there are Artifacts as far as Greece found that are Viking.


    3X3
    Tourist souvenirs?

 


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