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heat
7th March 2006, 09:27
Okey dokey, who believes that we are not alone in the universe? Are we visited form little green men? Are aliens actually 'little green men'? Anyone been abducted by aliens and ooooooo experimented on??
Maybe we actually evolved from aliens? Or are we an experiment, having been placed here by aliens and the regular sightings of them are actually the aliens carrying out research?

If we are visited by aliens (on the sly like) imagine how much more advanced than us they must be. Having watched GMTV this morning though I can completely understand why no other intelligent life form would want to make themselves known to us, that poor squid that was killed and pickled just so people can look at it cos of it's wow factor!

I suppose I must confess that I have actually seen a UFO- ask my mum if you don't believe me .
My dad was picking me up from work one day at Newstead Abbey, on the way back I saw 3 lights the shape of a 'V' in the sky moving very strangely - up, down, sideways - it was so obviously NOT an aircraft that we know of. Anyways all of a sudden it disappeared (the night sky was very clear) so I told my mum and dad about it and a couple of days later there was an article in the local paper about UFO's having been sighted in the area.
Go on then take the mick!

Dordie
7th March 2006, 10:07
Yes, I think they should be apprehended and forced to pay tax for contributing to non existant global warming.

Why should we pay it all? On the other hand, they could be seeking asylum!

Yojimbo
7th March 2006, 10:23
Going purely on the laws of probability, I would say that there has to be other lifeforms in a near infinite universe.

But will they be intelligent? Will they just be like the single cell bacteria that was found on Mars? No idea. Going on probability again, you could say that somewhere there has to be intelligent, conscious, self-reflective life, but will we ever find them? Will they find us?

Who really knows?

Dordie
7th March 2006, 10:30
Not a chance. Any possible other life form is light years away.

Light years cannot be converted to present time.

The concept is a non starter....and for si fi nutters.

Arthur
7th March 2006, 10:30
I think if we think that we are the only life form with any intelligence we are being rather naive and arrogant, I hope there is life out there somewhere, if not its an awful waste of space

heat
7th March 2006, 10:31
Would they wan't to find us? :lol8:

heat
7th March 2006, 10:33
801173 In 801173 Dordie said:


Light years cannot be converted to present time.



So far!

Arthur
7th March 2006, 10:40
801176 In 801176 heat said:
Would they wan't to find us? :lol8:




Yep they may be far to intelligent to even bother, if they are out their they must look down on us and laugh their heads off at us pissing in our own drinking water,

Dordie
7th March 2006, 10:42
801185 In 801185 Arthur said:
Yep they may be far to intelligent to even bother, if they are out their they must look down on us and laugh their heads off at us pissing in our own drinking water,


And pissing themselves at us putting up with such a false lying bastard as Blair.

Arthur
7th March 2006, 10:43
801188 In 801188 Dordie said:
And pissing themselves at us putting up with such a false lying bastard as Blair.




Blair and his cabinet are aliens, they are certainly from another planet thats for sure

Reg The Perring
7th March 2006, 14:16
You are asking questions which science can't answer. There is not enough available evidence. Observations or claims by people who say they had sightings is not sufficient for any scientific theories or even hypothesis. The vastness of the universe and the fact that other solar systems have been discovered can justify speculations about extra terrestrial civilisations. If there were or are aliens from other planets visiting Earth then governments would try to keep their presence a secret. Hence the reason why there are so many conspiracy theories about government cover ups on UFO sightings.

Durgemeister
7th March 2006, 15:13
The nearest star - Proxima Centauri - is about 4.22 Light years away, in other words, 4.22 x 186,000 x 60 x 60 x 24 x 365.25 miles away, or 24,770,191,392,000 Miles. The fastest man-made vehicle is currently one of the Voyager Probes, which was last clocked at about 39,000Mph, and at that speed, it would take over 72,000 years to get there.

The next development in space craft is reckoned to be the Ion-motor. In has been extensively tested, including on a NASA probe as the main propulsion, and a larger version of the motor could perhaps be used to propel manned craft at much greater speeds - in theory, they just continue accelerating.

According to Einstiens theories, on reaching Light Speed, your mass would become Infinite, and the other problem is that time travels slower for an object the faster it goes, so even if you could reach Proxima Centauri in 4.22 years, stay for 6 months, and then return 4.22 years later, a lot more time then nearly 9 years would have passed. I'm not sure of the maths involved, but you be talking in terms of Centuries or more.

But then of course, Science moves on continuously, and even some of our Alberts theories have been disproved over the years. Scientists do actually consider that "Warping" or Folding space is possible, therefore, it is not so much how fast you travel, but how close you can bring the object you want to get to.

I firmly believe that our Galaxy is full of life, both primative, and sentient. As a species though, we are still too barbaric and volatile to be approached. The knowledge that an Alien race could provide us with now would be misused to disasterous effect.

Reg The Perring
7th March 2006, 17:53
801372 In 801372 Durgemeister said:
According to Einstiens theories, on reaching Light Speed, your mass would become Infinite, and the other problem is that time travels slower for an object the faster it goes, so even if you could reach Proxima Centauri in 4.22 years, stay for 6 months, and then return 4.22 years later, a lot more time then nearly 9 years would have passed. I'm not sure of the maths involved, but you be talking in terms of Centuries or more.

What an absurd thing to say. You obviously have no clue about the nature of time dilatation. As you approach the speed of light time as you experience it will slow down. The people back on earth will still experience normal time. So they will age nine years. The spacemen if they are travelling at light speed will only age by six months. Their friends back on earth will be nine years older.


The time taken can be calculated by using a formula that Einstien developed with the help of Lorentz's Transformations. Here is the formula:
t' = t -sqrt(1-v2/c2)
where,
t' = time experienced by spacemen
t = time observed by people back on earth
v= velocity of spaceship
c -velocity of light

Lets assume the spaceship travelled at a lower velocity than light speed and took 5 years to get to reach Proxima Centauri which is at a distance of 2526073335400 miles from Earth.


The velocity of the spaceship will be:
v = 2526073335400 miles
43,800 hours

v = 5767290720.1mph
=1 602 02.52 mile/second


c= 180000 mps

v/c= 160202.52/
180000
= 0.89

by using Lorentz's Transformations we get:
1-(0.89)2 = 0.9879

so,
t' = 5 - sqrt(0.9879) = 5 -0.994 = 4.006

So the spacemen will have only aged four years and a bit, while their friends back at home will have aged five years. On the cosmic scale this is a small distance so you can imagine what it would be like at long distances and at speeds closer to light.




801372 In 801372 Durgemeister said:
But then of course, Science moves on continuously, and even some of our Alberts theories have been disproved over the years. Scientists do actually consider that "Warping" or Folding space is possible, therefore, it is not so much how fast you travel, but how close you can bring the object you want to get to.


Experiments using 'atomic clocks' on aircraft have already proven the reality of Time Dilatation.

nicknotnicked
7th March 2006, 18:03
801449 In 801449 Reg The Perring said:
What an absurd thing to say. You obviously have no clue about the nature of time dilatation. As you approach the speed of light time as you experience it will slow down. The people back on earth will still experience normal time. So they will age nine years. The spacemen if they are travelling at light speed will only age by six months. Their friends back on earth will be nine years older.


The time taken can be calculated by using a formula that Einstien developed with the help of Lorentz's Transformations. Here is the formula:
t' = t -sqrt(1-v2/c2)
where,
t' = time experienced by spacemen
t = time observed by people back on earth
v= velocity of spaceship
c -velocity of light

Lets assume the spaceship travelled at a lower velocity than light speed and took 5 years to get to reach Proxima Centauri which is at a distance of 2526073335400 miles from Earth.


The velocity of the spaceship will be:
v = 2526073335400 miles
43,800 hours

v = 5767290720.1mph
=1 602 02.52 mile/second


c= 180000 mps

v/c= 160202.52/
180000
= 0.89

by using Lorentz's Transformations we get:
1-(0.89)2 = 0.9879

so,
t' = 5 - sqrt(0.9879) = 5 -0.994 = 4.006

So the spacemen will have only aged four years and a bit, while their friends back at home will have aged five years. On the cosmic scale this is a small distance so you can imagine what it would be like at long distances and at speeds closer to light.





Experiments using 'atomic clocks' on aircraft have already proven the reality of Time Dilatation.


So using this formula when we send assylum seekers and refugees to them they will still be able to work?

Reg The Perring
7th March 2006, 18:33
801452 In 801452 nicknotnicked said:
So using this formula when we send assylum seekers and refugees to them they will still be able to work?


How the fuck would I know? I never been there, so go and ask someone who claims to have been abducted. Maybe they mightr know what goes on in other planets.

Durgemeister
7th March 2006, 19:48
801449 In 801449 Reg The Perring said:
What an absurd thing to say. You obviously have no clue about the nature of time dilatation. As you approach the speed of light time as you experience it will slow down. The people back on earth will still experience normal time. So they will age nine years. The spacemen if they are travelling at light speed will only age by six months. Their friends back on earth will be nine years older.


No clue about the nature of time dilation ? A rough idea, a very rough idea. I did actually point out that the "object" i.e. the spaceship would be experiencing time at a slower rate, and I did point out that I didn't know the maths involved. Thanks for the information though, even though it could have been delivered a little less pompously.

Reg The Perring
7th March 2006, 21:39
801483 In 801483 Durgemeister said:
No clue about the nature of time dilation ? A rough idea, a very rough idea. I did actually point out that the "object" i.e. the spaceship would be experiencing time at a slower rate, and I did point out that I didn't know the maths involved. Thanks for the information though, even though it could have been delivered a little less pompously.


Sorry about that. I sometimes get a bit carried away if I see something not quite right, but yes you had the basic idea.

Colonel
7th March 2006, 21:40
801551 In 801551 Reg The Perring said:
I sometimes get a bit carried away

You ought to be carried away.

Colonel

Reg The Perring
7th March 2006, 21:43
801552 In 801552 Colonel said:
You ought to be carried away.

Colonel


If UFO alien abductions are really a common occurance then maybe they might. :o

Colonel
7th March 2006, 21:47
801557 In 801557 Reg The Perring said:
If UFO alien abductions are really a common occurance then maybe they might. :o


If they are, then they are not getting much press coverage, do you think this is due to suppression by Blair, or just a load of codswallop.

Colonel

john barnes
7th March 2006, 22:48
http://english.pravda.ru/science/tech/16-02-2006/76045-0

try this link to read about projected spaceflight to sirius 8light year away in 80days

jmb

sphinx
7th March 2006, 22:53
Interesting. :yup2:

Durgemeister
7th March 2006, 22:58
801560 In 801560 Colonel said:
If they are, then they are not getting much press coverage, do you think this is due to suppression by Blair, or just a load of codswallop.

Colonel


I am still not sure about abductions myself. I like to keep an open mind on such things, although the obvious question is "Why the hell travel all this way to abduct a few people, mutilate a few cows, do a crop-circle, and then bugger off back home ?". Many aductees are reckoned to lucid, normal people, who have probably never even seen Star Trek, let alone bothered to wonder about the existance of ET.

There are loads of references across the internet to stories that if true, would make any worries about an Islamic uprising seem paltry in comparison. But I put them in the "Fascinating, but dubious" category. Nothing would ever be officially sanctioned anyway...

...although I did see a story last year that India, due it's total disclosure policy, had been "approached", and were to announce it to their people , but I'm guessing that if there is any "agreement" regarding Alien contact Internationally, they were forced/persuaded to follow in line with other governments. If indeed of course there were any truth in it !

Durgemeister
7th March 2006, 23:02
801551 In 801551 Reg The Perring said:
Sorry about that. I sometimes get a bit carried away if I see something not quite right, but yes you had the basic idea.



No worries. Like I say, I have a basic understanding of a lot of this stuff, I just need to brush up on the finer points.

The Teacher
8th March 2006, 23:12
Not read all this thread but I don't believe we are alone in the universe for the simple reason of the size of the universe.

I am not saying that there little green men out there or creatures with 3 heads or whatever but I do believe that there is certainly another form of intelligent out somewhere out there.

A lot of the ancient monuments, Mayan, Incan, etc., are said to be there for the purposes of alien life coming here. Who knows?

The Teacher

Bill. MC
8th March 2006, 23:27
801449 In 801449 Reg The Perring said:
What an absurd thing to say. You obviously have no clue about the nature of time dilatation. As you approach the speed of light time as you experience it will slow down. The people back on earth will still experience normal time. So they will age nine years. The spacemen if they are travelling at light speed will only age by six months. Their friends back on earth will be nine years older.


The time taken can be calculated by using a formula that Einstien developed with the help of Lorentz's Transformations. Here is the formula:
t' = t -sqrt(1-v2/c2)
where,
t' = time experienced by spacemen
t = time observed by people back on earth
v= velocity of spaceship
c -velocity of light

Lets assume the spaceship travelled at a lower velocity than light speed and took 5 years to get to reach Proxima Centauri which is at a distance of 2526073335400 miles from Earth.


The velocity of the spaceship will be:
v = 2526073335400 miles
43,800 hours

v = 5767290720.1mph
=1 602 02.52 mile/second


c= 180000 mps

v/c= 160202.52/
180000
= 0.89

by using Lorentz's Transformations we get:
1-(0.89)2 = 0.9879

so,
t' = 5 - sqrt(0.9879) = 5 -0.994 = 4.006

So the spacemen will have only aged four years and a bit, while their friends back at home will have aged five years. On the cosmic scale this is a small distance so you can imagine what it would be like at long distances and at speeds closer to light.



I hate to tell you this REg, but your arithmetic is a bit out. I notice that the time dilitation was a bit small. I checked your calculation and you seemd to have the distance from Proxima Centauri all wrong. You said that it is 2526073335400 miles from Earth. This is how I worked it out:
4.2 year = 132,451,200 second
So if travelling at light speed; 180000mps
180000 * 132,451,200 = 23841216000000miles

If time = 5years, 5 year = 157,680,000 second

velocity = distance/time
v = 23841216000000/157,680,000 = 151200mps

t' = t* sqrt(1-v2/c2)
t' = 5*sqrt(1-1512002/1800002)
= 5*sqrt(1-22861400000/32400000000)
= 5*sqrt(1-0.7056)
= 0.2944years

So the spacemen would only age by 0.29 while folks back onm earth would age by five years.

I found this page at the BBC's site and it gives a fairly balanced account of UFOs and aliens:
http://www.bbc.co.uk/science/space/life/aliens/ufos/

lynlegs
8th March 2006, 23:32
801604 In 801604 john barnes said:
http://english.pravda.ru/science/tech/16-02-2006/76045-0

try this link to read about projected spaceflight to sirius 8light year away in 80days

jmb




how can we be alone if we are answering you lol

Reg The Perring
9th March 2006, 10:01
802028 In 802028 Bill. MC said:
I hate to tell you this REg, but your arithmetic is a bit out. I notice that the time dilitation was a bit small. I checked your calculation and you seemd to have the distance from Proxima Centauri all wrong. You said that it is 2526073335400 miles from Earth. This is how I worked it out:
4.2 year = 132,451,200 second
So if travelling at light speed; 180000mps
180000 * 132,451,200 = 23841216000000miles

If time = 5years, 5 year = 157,680,000 second

velocity = distance/time
v = 23841216000000/157,680,000 = 151200mps

t' = t* sqrt(1-v2/c2)
t' = 5*sqrt(1-1512002/1800002)
= 5*sqrt(1-22861400000/32400000000)
= 5*sqrt(1-0.7056)
= 0.2944years

So the spacemen would only age by 0.29 while folks back onm earth would age by five years.

I found this page at the BBC's site and it gives a fairly balanced account of UFOs and aliens:
http://www.bbc.co.uk/science/space/life/aliens/ufos/


Hmmmmm, thanks Bill for correwcting me. I must have got a little bit mixed up.

Richard
9th March 2006, 11:04
Very interesting and one of those questions which haunt mankind
We have with all our present knowledge found nothing in the universe
That we could call life even after we put a telescope in space away
From our atmosphere and able to see very far still nothing.
I would forget about light speed even if we could do light speed
As others have pointed out it would not really help.
Only in the realms of star trek i.e. or worm holes if it
Where possible to travel through as a gateway into another universe
And return would we be able to travel to other far distant universes.
One would say there must be something out there but so far away
We can never hope to make contact.
Our world is unique

Durgemeister
9th March 2006, 11:11
802170 In 802170 Reg The Perring said:
Hmmmmm, thanks Bill for correwcting me. I must have got a little bit mixed up.


....and I'll be a right pain in the arse. Small Point, but isn't the Speed of light 186,000mps, not 180,000 ?

Colonel
9th March 2006, 11:58
Indeed it is Durge but then that would be nitpicking, so I did not comment myself.

Colonel

Reg The Perring
9th March 2006, 16:10
802207 In 802207 Durgemeister said:
....and I'll be a right pain in the arse. Small Point, but isn't the Speed of light 186,000mps, not 180,000 ?


Oh yes so it is. Thanks for pointing that out to me.

Reg The Perring
9th March 2006, 17:13
802207 In 802207 Durgemeister said:
....and I'll be a right pain in the arse. Small Point, but isn't the Speed of light 186,000mps, not 180,000 ?


Glad you pointed that out Durgemeister.
I re-did the calculation and this time I got:
4.2 year = 132,451,200 second
So if travelling at light speed; 186,282.397 mps
186,282.397 * 132,451,200 = 24673327021526.4miles

If time = 5years, 5 year = 157,680,000 second

velocity = distance/time
v = 24673327021526.4 / 157,680,000 = 156477.21348mps

t' = t* sqrt(1-v2/c2)
t' = 5*sqrt(1-24485100000/34701100000)
= 5*sqrt(1-0.706)
= 2.7years

Bill. MC
9th March 2006, 21:43
802207 In 802207 Durgemeister said:
....and I'll be a right pain in the arse. Small Point, but isn't the Speed of light 186,000mps, not 180,000 ?



I must have overlooked that one Durge. Nowadays I am more used to the metric value of 300,000 kps.

Memnoch
10th March 2006, 10:38
Are we alone?
Statistically unlikely. All the things 'out there' that are big enough for us to see, we see more than one example of. In other words we've yet to find anything unique. If Earth is unique, then it's the only unique thing in the universe, which would probably count as the most unlikely, surprising thing in the history of everything ever, so on that basis I'm going to say no, we're not alone, simply because It would be more surprising to know for certain that we are than it would be to know for certain that we're not.

How many "others" are there?
Your guess is as good as mine. Put any numbers you like in the Drake equation and chances are the output will be somewhere between one and a million, but just for the hell of it, here's my completely arbitrary solution:

N = N* fp ne fl fi fc fL

In the above equation,
N is the number of technological (i.e. capable in principle of communicating with others) civilisations in this galaxy.
N* is the number of stars in the galaxy
fp is the proportion of stars that have planetary systems
ne is the number of planets per system that are suitable for life
fl is the proportion of suitable planets on which life actually appears
fi is the proportion of life-bearing planets on which intelligence appears
fc is the proportion of intelligent races that develop the means to communicate
fL is proportion of a communicating planet's timeline during which civilizations actually live

So, taking each factor in turn:
N* - How many stars are in this galaxy? 100 billion
fp - How many have planets? Call it a fifth... 20 billion
ne - How many planets are capable of supporting life? 1 per system = 20 billion
fl - How many capable planets actually do support life? Call it half. 10 billion
fi - How many develop intelligence? From a Darwinian perspective I'd say quite a lot. Maybe 10 percent. One billion
fc - How many intelligent planets will develop communication technology? I'd say most of them eventually, if they have the raw materials available. No idea what metals are available on other planets so I'll have a random guess at twenty percent. 200 million.
fL - How long does civilisation exist in relation to the lifetime of the planet? Well, if Earth is typical, maybe not very long. We think the total lifetime of Earth will be about 10 billion years and we've only been communicating for 100 years. That's a hundred millionth of the timeline, giving a fianl total of 2 technological civilisations in the galaxy, including us!

Multiply that by the number of galaxies and there are hundreds of billions of intelligent races in the observable universe.

Problem: To communicate with another race by radio, they'd have to be in line of sight and they'd have to be alive at the same time as us. Chances are they're either dead, or not been born yet, or hidden on the other side of the galaxy. The chances of communicating with another galaxy are as near to zero as makes no difference.
Supposing there were an extraterriastral astronomer somewhere in this galaxy, looking for intelligent life. What are his chances of finding us?

Well, the galaxy is probably around 10 billion years old and he might have been alive at any point in the galaxy's past, or indeed its future. But he only has a 100 year window in which he can see us by our radio emissions. That means even if he pointed his telescope directly at Earth, he would only have a 1 in a hundred million chance of doing so at the right time.


Of course you can improve the odds by putting different numbers in the equation, but one thing you can't change is the speed of light. The galaxy is about a hundred thousand light-years across, which means that all but a few hundred out of all those billions of stars are more than a lifetime away. Even if you knew precisely where to send your signal, chances are you'd be dead long before you got an answer.

Have ETs visited Earth?
Almost certainly not. If they came here at sublight speed, they'd have to be from somewhere close enough for us to have detected their radio signatures before they got here. If they have warp drive, they'd be at no possible risk from us and would have no need to hide. If they hide because of an interplanetary non-interference law, they have technology that makes it extremely unlikely that they would accidentally reveal themselves as often as Mr & Mrs Marijuana from California would have you believe. If they were here, either no one would know, or everyone would know.

Have Earthers been abducted by aliens?
No.
The only way they could guarantee to keep it secret would be to kill their subjects, so either everyone would die, or, again, they wouldn't try to keep it secret and everyone would know about it.


In conclusion, I think there are ETs out there. I think it extremely unlikely that they would know about us, and I think it's next to impossible that they could have actually been here.


M

Nefetiri
10th March 2006, 10:47
I think the universe is so infinite that it would be a great waste of space if we were the only "intelligent" cough cough life forms out there i presonally believe that out there somewhere are other creatures i'm not so sure they are little green men tho i kinda like the idea of the series stargate somewher out there are other life forms and diverse cultures

Bill. MC
10th March 2006, 11:04
801483 In 801483 Durgemeister said:
No clue about the nature of time dilation ?

If you like reading an interesting and enertaining sci-fi novel, then I recommend a read of Poul Anderson's "Tau Zero". It should also give a basic understanding of time dilation.

Bill. MC
10th March 2006, 11:06
802796 In 802796 Nefetiri said:
I think the universe is so infinite


There is a finite amount of mass in the universe; so the universe can't be infinite.

Memnoch
10th March 2006, 11:11
802802 In 802802 Bill. MC said:
There is a finite amount of mass in the universe; so the universe can't be infinite.
If the universe were infinite, you wouldn't be able to see it all because there'd never be an end to it. Therefore you can only measure the part that you can observe. This holds whether the universe is finite or infinite - you can only say that the observable universe is finite, which is a true statement and a logical necessity regardless of the status of the whole universe. :)

Durgemeister
10th March 2006, 11:39
802800 In 802800 Bill. MC said:
If you like reading an interesting and enertaining sci-fi novel, then I recommend a read of Poul Anderson's "Tau Zero". It should also give a basic understanding of time dilation.


If you look a little closer at the context, that was a rhetorical question. But as I pointed out to Reg, I am rusty, and I could do with refreshing myself with the finer points of physics.

Bill. MC
10th March 2006, 12:24
802819 In 802819 Durgemeister said:
If you look a little closer at the context, that was a rhetorical question. But as I pointed out to Reg, I am rusty, and I could do with refreshing myself with the finer points of physics.


Yes but if you or anyone else is interested in this sort of thing then you will find it a good read. Sometimes you can learn a fair amount of 'real science' by reading a good sci-fi novel.

Durgemeister
10th March 2006, 12:41
802842 In 802842 Bill. MC said:
Yes but if you or anyone else is interested in this sort of thing then you will find it a good read. Sometimes you can learn a fair amount of 'real science' by reading a good sci-fi novel.


tbh a large portion of my awareness of physics comes from sci-fi, I just don't read enough anyway, and despite having a copy of 3001, the rest of my collection is Douglas Adams, and a couple of Red Dwarf books. I'm currently filling my PDA with eBooks, so I shall see what I can find.

Nefetiri
10th March 2006, 12:43
don't forget Kevin Anderson and Isac Asimov also very good writers in the sci fi context

The Teacher
11th March 2006, 01:12
It is all there in black and white:

Doctor Who and the .....
Doctor Who and the....

and so on.

The Teacher

Dordie
11th March 2006, 01:17
Are we alone in the universe? Not whilst those from the east keep piling in here we're not!

Bill. MC
11th March 2006, 16:24
803193 In 803193 Dordie said:
Not whilst those from the east keep piling in here we're not!


If you think that is bad then just wait till the aliens land from planet Islama.

Bill. MC
11th March 2006, 19:07
802850 In 802850 Nefetiri said:
don't forget Kevin Anderson and Isac Asimov also very good writers in the sci fi context


Another good book by Poul Anderson is "The High Crusade". It has a rather bizarre theme to it; more like science fantasy than fiction. An alien spce craft lands in near a sleepy English village during the middle ages. Instead of abducting anyone their craft gets hijacked by a group of knights who had been preparing to fight in the Holy Land. They embark on a journey to the aliens home planet and have battles with the aliens.

Bill. MC
11th March 2006, 19:18
802791 In 802791 Memnoch said:
fi is the proportion of life-bearing planets on which intelligence appears
fc is the proportion of intelligent races that develop the means to communicate


This is an interesting part of the equation worthy of deeper considerations. Such as their levels of technological advancement. Alien civilisations more advanced than us will have a remote possibility of communicating or visiting us, yet at the same time they will be more likely to contact us than those which are at the same level as us. A consideration of the maximum possible level of advancement might give us an even better idea of our chances of meeting aliens. How many more years advanced than us could an alien civilisation possibly be? Thousands or even millions of years? Is there a better chance of finding more advanced aliens in the outer or inner parts of our galaxy? I suppose it must all depend on how many stellar systems there are similar to our own and which developed before ours did.