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Reg Perrin
4th April 2016, 07:14
Knew immediately.....

Fairy_Nuff
4th April 2016, 08:27
Me too, though I wish I didn't.


x:5

Durgemeister
4th April 2016, 08:37
I'm a southerner, and even I know what that is.

Lord Ponsonby
4th April 2016, 08:42
Knew immediately.....

Is it your liver?

Dordie
4th April 2016, 09:40
Tripe.

Durgemeister
4th April 2016, 09:43
Tripe.

No, it's true I tells ya.

Dordie
4th April 2016, 09:45
No, it's true I tells ya.

Yeah but...it has to do with Perrin!

Calidore
4th April 2016, 10:55
it's tripe, is there a word that combine foul and vile? that's what this word would describe.

we used to feed it to a puppy we had who had special dietary needs as she was very small.

she turned out well, she was a very clever sheepdog, nice.

Calidore
4th April 2016, 10:56
actually it would be a either voul (vowel) or file, neither of which are new or particularly horrible so forget I said that.

Fork Me
4th April 2016, 12:42
Knew immediately.....

It's something disgusting that people from the Northern wastelands think of as people food and Southerners feed to their dogs...

Alice
4th April 2016, 13:54
I would just like to go on record, as a Northern Wastelander, to point out that I have never and would never eat tripe.

Alice
4th April 2016, 13:56
Also, got just one thing to say to the Southern pansies who frequent this board...

Jellied eels.

Durgemeister
4th April 2016, 14:17
Also, got just one thing to say to the Southern pansies who frequent this board...

Jellied eels.

For years I struggled with Pork Pies because of the jelly... so you can forget about Jellied Eels..

... reminds of the "good old days" when I used to live in St.Albans. Not exactly the East End, but there were people that used to do the rounds popping into the pubs with various Sea-food "treats". I used to partake with their take on a Prawn Cocktail.

One of our lot had a condition akin to the "DTs" (I think it's something like Essential Tremors, and these days he has an electronic implant to control them) and it was a sight to behold watching someone with severe "shakes" eating Jellied Eels.

mini_haha
4th April 2016, 14:30
I've eaten it , quite liked it until they told me what it was , then it was queue the vomit

Calidore
4th April 2016, 16:49
It's true that people get tougher the further north you go - just be glad you don't live in the north of Greenland where you could be faced with eating this or starving:

(Be aware, this (http://www.bbc.co.uk/blogs/food/2011/01/rotten-seabirds-for-supper.shtml) is so revolting it actually made me feel sick to read)

The dish on the menu is kiviaq and at first sniff it divides the film crew – from those who were strangely curious to those who wanted to retch. Ikuo and his son showed us how kiviaq is made from fermented sea birds. The delicacy is created by first preparing a seal skin: all the meat is removed and only a thick layer of fat remains. The skin is then sewn into a bag shape, which is stuffed with 300-500 little auk birds. Once full and airtight, the skin is sewn up and seal fat is smeared over all over the join, which acts as a repellent to flies. The seal skin is then left under a pile of rocks to ferment for a minimum of three months to a maximum of 18 months.

As winter arrives and hunting for other game becomes difficult due to the darkness and unsafe ice, Ikuo and his family look forward to digging out the kiviaq and sharing it with their family and friends. They always eat it outside as the smell is so overpowering that it would linger inside the house for weeks. The seal fat helps to both preserve and tenderise the bird meat so it can be eaten raw and whole, bones and all. It was quite a sight to see the family holding bird’s legs in their teeth and stripping off the feathers before chowing down on large parts of the bird.


God that's revolting...

sphinx
4th April 2016, 17:08
:j4 @ the dead birds Cali......



We ate tripe sometimes during the war years (that and horsemeat were better than no protein at all I'm sure). I think it was cooked with onions and a white sauce....I don't remember either liking or disliking it. We weren't fussy about food back then. :r5

I have never eaten it since, but in later years my son used to get it and boil it up for his dogs...they loved it.

Dordie
4th April 2016, 17:26
We weren't fussy about food back then.


I was fussy, I could not help it, so.... I had to have AWFUL Cod Liver oil and Malt and liquid Iron medicine....it was VILE but it kept me alive.

Alice
4th April 2016, 17:45
I was fussy, I could not help it, so.... I had to have AWFUL Cod Liver oil and Malt and liquid Iron medicine....it was VILE but it kept me alive.

Not so very long ago someone of your generation persuaded me it would be a good idea to gargle with TCP for a sore throat. :rolleyes:

I accidentally swallowed some and was sick as a dog. Now just the smell of it makes me heave.

sphinx
4th April 2016, 17:45
I was fussy, I could not help it, so.... I had to have AWFUL Cod Liver oil and Malt and liquid Iron medicine...

Serves you right. :teeth:

Actually I had those things too...I believe all children did? I didn't find them too bad at all, and actually liked the codliver oil and malt stuff. :D

sphinx
4th April 2016, 17:47
Not so very long ago someone of your generation persuaded me it would be a good idea to gargle with TCP for a sore throat. :rolleyes:

I accidentally swallowed some and was sick as a dog. Now just the smell of it makes me heave.

LOL...we had TCP for cuts and scratches, but don't remember anyone gargling with it. It stank then, and still does (stands for Tom Cat P*ss doen't it? )...I can smell it a mile off if someone has used it for any reason. :j4

Dordie
4th April 2016, 18:07
LOL...we had TCP for cuts and scratches,

We had Iodine......stung like fury!

sphinx
4th April 2016, 18:18
We had Iodine......stung like fury!


Oh yes! I had forgotten about that. Brown stuff I think? :s8

...and what about milk of magnesia if we had a bit of a tummy upset? :-s

Reg Perrin
4th April 2016, 18:24
Is it your liver?

No, I think it's a portion of Bill's brain. There....will you Rightards "like" that as well?

Alice
4th April 2016, 19:00
Oh yes! I had forgotten about that. Brown stuff I think? :s8

...and what about milk of magnesia if we had a bit of a tummy upset? :-s

Oh God, I remember my Mother giving me that once when I had some vomiting bug. Tasted like chalk, another memory to make me heave.

Reg Perrin
4th April 2016, 19:29
Oh God, I remember my Mother giving me that once when I had some vomiting bug. Tasted like chalk, another memory to make me heave.

On the other hand what about Farleys Rusks, Gripe Water, Coltsfoot rock and Kayli....

Fork Me
4th April 2016, 20:53
:j4 @ the dead birds Cali......



We ate tripe sometimes during the war years (that and horsemeat were better than no protein at all I'm sure). I think it was cooked with onions and a white sauce....I don't remember either liking or disliking it. We weren't fussy about food back then. :r5

I have never eaten it since, but in later years my son used to get it and boil it up for his dogs...they loved it.

I've eaten horse meat in France, it was nice.

Fork Me
4th April 2016, 20:56
LOL...we had TCP for cuts and scratches, but don't remember anyone gargling with it. It stank then, and still does (stands for Tom Cat P*ss doen't it? )...I can smell it a mile off if someone has used it for any reason. :j4

Actually, it stands for trichlorophenylmethyliodosalicyl, even though it doesn't actually contain that particular chemical any more (and hasn't done since the 50s).

Fork Me
4th April 2016, 20:59
We had Iodine......stung like fury!

They still use iodine for cuts and things here fairly routinely, comes in a green plastic bottle and stains everything.

In the villages they use zivania instead - which is the Cypriot rotgut made by distilling the remains of the fermented grape juice not used for wine.

Reg Perrin
4th April 2016, 21:59
They still use iodine for cuts and things here fairly routinely, comes in a green plastic bottle and stains everything.

In the villages they use zivania instead - which is the Cypriot rotgut made by distilling the remains of the fermented grape juice not used for wine.

Would it be called Gentian Violet in the olden days?

superwoman
4th April 2016, 23:01
Farleys Rusks,

still yummy!

Fork Me
5th April 2016, 05:01
Would it be called Gentian Violet in the olden days?

No Gentian Violet was something completely different. Nowadays it's mainly used in labs to stain bacteria and other cells in the lab. (The Gram Stain, which uses it is the first tool in indentifying bacteria).

Used on the skin it's not brilliant against bacteria but is an excellent fungicide. Because it stains the skin, surgeons sometimes use it to mark where to cut before operations. It's also used in normal inks and dyes.

Iodine is just elemental iodine dissolved in an alcohol based solvent. It's a brownish colour rather than violet. (Iodine is pink or violet when dissolved in oil, brown in alcohol or water).

Calidore
5th April 2016, 05:58
What i dont get is how a solvent doesnt destroy the element is is carrying. Could someone explain that please?

Scrotnig
5th April 2016, 07:51
What i dont get is how a solvent doesnt destroy the element is is carrying. Could someone explain that please?

Yes. You can make it easily. Just use a little 16g CO2 cartridge that's meant for inflating bicycle tyres.

Alice
5th April 2016, 08:24
still yummy!

Not a patch on chocolate Hobnobs.

Fork Me
5th April 2016, 10:18
What i dont get is how a solvent doesnt destroy the element is is carrying. Could someone explain that please?

Why would it?

Dissolving is not a chemical reaction, it's just a type of mixing where the particles are attracted to each other, but the molecules themselves are not affected.

Let's look at a simple example with a compound. Glucose is a molecule made of 6 carbons, 6 oxygens and 12 hydrogens (written C6H12O6). When you burn it, the molecule itself breaks up and forms carbon dioxide and water, a simple chemical reaction.

However, when you mix it with water, all that happens is that the polarity of the water molecules (one end is more positive then the other, which is more negative) disrupts the weaker forces BETWEEN the glucose molecules (which hold it together as a solid) and separates, them, the glucose molecules are now mixed with the water molecules and the whole solution is a liquid, however, the glucose molecules themselves remain intact. Each is still C6H12O6.

In the case of elemental iodine, the basic idea is the same, iodine doesn;t normally exist as atoms, it exists as molecules, each molecule containing two iodine atoms tightly bound to each other (I2). As a pure element, it is a solid at room temperature, these I2 molecules are stuck together by weak forces. It doesn't dissolve well in water, but put it in alcohol (or oil for that matter) and the weak bonds between molecules are disrupted and it mixes with the liquid (dissolves), but the I2 molecules still exist. The alcohol can break the weak forces BETWEEN molecules, but not the strong forces (bonds) inside the molecule.

Generally polar substances (like glucose, salts etc), dissolve best in polar solvents (like water) and non polar substances (like iodine, candle wax) dissolve best in non polar substances (like oil). Alcohol is an unusual solvent as it has a polar end and a non-polar end so it can mix with both oil and water, and can dissolve both polar and non-polar substances.

This difference between polar and non-polar is why oil and water form layers, but alcohol and water mix perfectly

Dordie
5th April 2016, 11:25
but alcohol and water mix perfectly

Every piss artist should know that!