PDA

View Full Version : I'm in Ealing



Reg Perrin
14th April 2015, 10:09
There are lots of very friendly immigrants here. You're very lucky to have such diversity down here.

Cynic
14th April 2015, 10:11
There are lots of very friendly immigrants here. You're very lucky to have such diversity down here.

It used to be full of friendly non-immigrants. x:3

Dordie
14th April 2015, 10:18
There are lots of very friendly immigrants here. You're very lucky to have such diversity down here.

I know, your in a pub on a protest march about something or other. y:1

Reg Perrin
14th April 2015, 10:20
I'm placing a little girl for adoption with one of said immigrants.

bill jarvis
14th April 2015, 10:21
There are lots of very friendly immigrants here. You're very lucky to have such diversity down here.
Wait till it gets dark.

Calidore
14th April 2015, 10:21
Different world.

Reg Perrin
14th April 2015, 10:27
Wait till it gets dark.

I was out at 11.00 last night, does that count ? It seemed OK to me.

Reg Perrin
14th April 2015, 10:45
I'm placing a little girl for adoption with one of said immigrants.

One of the benefits of immigration.

Calidore
14th April 2015, 11:08
It's nice walking around the ethic areas on a sunny morning, like being on holiday.

Reg Perrin
14th April 2015, 11:12
It's nice walking around the ethic areas on a sunny morning, like being on holiday.

It was fine last night. Buzzing.

Alice
14th April 2015, 11:25
I've just seen something around here I didn't even know existed. I thought it was a police van at first, similar markings, and there were a couple of what I took to be police officers, dressed in black at the rear doors of it with walkie talkies. As I passed alongside I saw that it read on the side, "Home Office, Immigration Enforcement."

Dordie
14th April 2015, 11:32
I've just seen something around here I didn't even know existed. I thought it was a police van at first, similar markings, and there were a couple of what I took to be police officers, dressed in black at the rear doors of it with walkie talkies. As I passed alongside I saw that it read on the side, "Home Office, Immigration Enforcement."

Tell them Perrin is in Ealing. :q8

Calidore
14th April 2015, 11:33
I've just seen about twenty islamic bints all wearing the same black gear, those bundled up headscarves, walking along somewhere. Probably a tour, I didn't notice what language they were speaking. It's bordering on effrontery.

Dordie
14th April 2015, 12:15
I've just seen about twenty islamic bints

Shitbints is the word you are searching for. :smug10:

Dordie
14th April 2015, 12:38
There are lots of very friendly immigrants here. You're very lucky to have such diversity down here.

Don't make the mistake of dropping in at Oxon on the way back, the weather there is foul and you know who lives there. If that person gets their hands on you goodness knows what will happen. :nod:

Reg Perrin
14th April 2015, 13:25
I'm on the train back now. Arrive in the peaceful north east at 4:45. The visit was very successful.

Durgemeister
14th April 2015, 13:39
*shudder* London !!. Once took over someone's London duties in my old job... simple enough - drop off three markets, and then go to mine - I forget where, but somewhere like Ealing, somewhere in West London anyway... Market start normally 9am (Set-up usually about an hour or so earlier.), I never actually got a chance to properly set-up, as I was pounced on by customers as soon as I arrived at about 10:30....

... The annoying part is that they only sent me to London once or twice, and apart from just meeting someone at the Hotel to swap van-loads, I nearly always got lost !!.

Alice
14th April 2015, 13:41
I'm on the train back now. Arrive in the peaceful north east at 4:45. The visit was very successful.

When I went to London recently there was a definite sense of relief when getting back on the train and heading North.

Durgemeister
14th April 2015, 13:46
When I went to London recently there was a definite sense of relief when getting back on the train and heading North.

Same here, except going south. Mind you, last time I came back, I walked from Blackfriars to Waterloo along the river side, I even saw Shaun (The Sheep).

Alice
14th April 2015, 13:54
Same here, except going south. Mind you, last time I came back, I walked from Blackfriars to Waterloo along the river side, I even saw Shaun (The Sheep).

I don't think I am familiar with him, I take it he's famous?

Reg Perrin
14th April 2015, 13:55
When I went to London recently there was a definite sense of relief when getting back on the train and heading North.

Give me the north, any day.

Durgemeister
14th April 2015, 14:01
I don't think I am familiar with him, I take it he's famous?

He must be on Made in Chelsea, his performance was, well, plastic.

Fork Me
14th April 2015, 14:05
It's bordering on effrontery.

Why is it?

Calidore
14th April 2015, 14:25
Why is it?

Do you think I'm being paranoid? It's like a theatre troop of cult members, but it's not theatre.

Calidore
14th April 2015, 14:28
I always feel a little disappointed leaving London for Oxford which is so small and familiar. I like London.

Fork Me
14th April 2015, 14:33
Do you think I'm being paranoid? It's like a theatre troop of cult members, but it's not theatre.
I'm not quite sure what you're being, but I thought freedom of expression existed in the UK meaning they can wear whatever they want.

I quite genuinely don't understand why anyone would have a problem with the way they dress.

Alice
14th April 2015, 14:45
I'm not quite sure what you're being, but I thought freedom of expression existed in the UK meaning they can wear whatever they want.

I quite genuinely don't understand why anyone would have a problem with the way they dress.

I think some people find it intimidating. But my objection to it stems from the fact that it's degrading for women to be told how to dress by men in the name of religion. And I simply don't believe they choose such garb, they have been conditioned into it.

Fork Me
14th April 2015, 15:17
I think some people find it intimidating. But my objection to it stems from the fact that it's degrading for women to be told how to dress by men in the name of religion. And I simply don't believe they choose such garb, they have been conditioned into it.

I think some do choose it, and if they do, they are entitled to make that choice.

Having said that I agree that nobody should be pressured or forced to wear it.

Scrotnig
14th April 2015, 15:19
I think some do choose it, and if they do, they are entitled to make that choice.
Rubbish. This is just more Muslim apologism from you, as we have come to expect.

Even some Muslims campaign against this type of dress, on the grounds that it is repressing women. Yet here you are claiming they choose it of their own free will. Bollox.

Fork Me
14th April 2015, 15:21
Rubbish. This is just more Muslim apologism from you, as we have come to expect.

Grow up.

Reg Perrin
14th April 2015, 17:30
I'm back.

Dordie
14th April 2015, 18:00
I think some people find it intimidating. But my objection to it stems from the fact that it's degrading for women to be told how to dress by men in the name of religion. And I simply don't believe they choose such garb, they have been conditioned into it.

And some were it to defiantly parade their shit religion.

Dordie
14th April 2015, 18:01
I'm back.

I'll tell sphinx.

Reg Perrin
14th April 2015, 18:39
It's an interesting dilemma. You could argue that the clothing worn by both men and women is determined by their culture, in most cases that culture is dominated by men. Muslims genuinely feel that the "dress" of Western women demeans them, they could have a bit of a point. On balance I think that the culture that oppresses a gender into such an extreme form of dress (and other gender specific discrimination) is wrong. I wouldn't get too arsey about groups of women "parading" around in them though, they're the victims after all, the cruellest aspect of the oppression being that it's so culturally ingrained they actually defend the practice. It's the same with FGM. I'm not sure if these are specifically Muslim or regionally based practices that have become subsumed into Islam (and then perhaps spread with Islam)

Lord Ponsonby
14th April 2015, 21:01
When I went to London recently there was a definite sense of relief when getting back on the train and heading North.

The relief was from the Londoners.

Reg Perrin
14th April 2015, 21:43
The relief was from the Londoners.

LOL

Chris Mitchell
14th April 2015, 21:49
Rubbish. This is just more Muslim apologism from you, as we have come to expect.

Even some Muslims campaign against this type of dress, on the grounds that it is repressing women. Yet here you are claiming they choose it of their own free will. Bollox.

Are you in favour of the State telling people what they can or can't wear?

Chris Mitchell
14th April 2015, 21:51
I love London. Actually, I love Newcastle, Leicester and Manchester too.

Maybe it's a leftie thing? It only seems to be rightards on here who hate their own country or location.

Reg Perrin
14th April 2015, 22:34
Are you in favour of the State telling people what they can or can't wear?

I'm in favour of the state telling people what they shouldn't look like, and that would be Scrot and Memnoch. Sounds like a feasible policy for the Conservatives.

Reg Perrin
14th April 2015, 22:36
I love London. Actually, I love Newcastle, Leicester and Manchester too.

Maybe it's a leftie thing? It only seems to be rightards on here who hate their own country or location.

Vibrant, diverse urban centres. What I dislike (I wouldn't call it hate) are declining town centres or dying coastal towns.

Calidore
14th April 2015, 22:40
I suppose it's the way the headscarves etc stand out when you see a load together. I am not bothered much by the existence of mainstream Islam, just not a huge fan, that's all.

ronniex
15th April 2015, 14:43
I've just seen something around here I didn't even know existed. I thought it was a police van at first, similar markings, and there were a couple of what I took to be police officers, dressed in black at the rear doors of it with walkie talkies. As I passed alongside I saw that it read on the side, "Home Office, Immigration Enforcement."

Did you make a run for it, George?:action2:

ronniex
15th April 2015, 14:46
I've just seen about twenty islamic bints all wearing the same black gear, those bundled up headscarves, walking along somewhere. Probably a tour, I didn't notice what language they were speaking. It's bordering on effrontery.

You sure it wasn't a platoon of paratroopers from the Islamic army? Were any of them carrying round black spheres which had fuses sticking out of the top?

Plutonium
15th April 2015, 15:41
It's an interesting dilemma. You could argue that the clothing worn by both men and women is determined by their culture, in most cases that culture is dominated by men. Muslims genuinely feel that the "dress" of Western women demeans them, they could have a bit of a point. On balance I think that the culture that oppresses a gender into such an extreme form of dress (and other gender specific discrimination) is wrong. I wouldn't get too arsey about groups of women "parading" around in them though, they're the victims after all, the cruellest aspect of the oppression being that it's so culturally ingrained they actually defend the practice. It's the same with FGM. I'm not sure if these are specifically Muslim or regionally based practices that have become subsumed into Islam (and then perhaps spread with Islam)

I've previously made clear my own opposition to the burka/niqab. As a rule, I don't make a judgement on what people wear, but there are limits. I couldn't walk down the street stark naked, for example. Even walking down the street in just a pair of speedos might attract the attention of the police. At the opposite extreme, facial coverings (unless needed for some reason in a certain circumstance, like a crash helmet for example) are inherently anti-social. It cuts the individual off from (a) recognition, which is largely based on facial features, and (b) facial expression, which is a form of communication far older than speech.

Maybe if Muslims required both men and women to cover their faces, it could be argued that it is a legitimate cultural norm. But why is only one gender required to do so? It is clearly to me a form of oppression of women.

Muslim women in the UK didn't used to wear burkas/niqabs. It's only started in the past twenty years, and it's a statement that these people are doing the opposite of integrating into British society, they are separating from it and adopting a colonial attitude.

The French did the right thing by banning the burka. But then, the French are ahead of us in many ways, unencumbered with the kind of 'political correctness' we have here. For example, there have been over 100 prosecutions in France for FGM, compared with barely a handful here, but I daresay it is as widespread here as it is/was in France.

Fork Me and the rest of the Politically Correct brigade will be along shortly to haul me over the coals. Well what I say is this. They oppose a ban on the burka; well they're entitled to their opinion. It's a pity they don't think I'm entitled to mine.

Durgemeister
15th April 2015, 18:56
One of the issues in my mind, is the idea that this level of "modesty" is not even - as far as I know, if someone could correct me I would appreciate it - really required within the religion. I have no issue with head-scarves, many white/english non-muslims cover up part of their face, but when someone is fully covered up, bollocks to cultural sensitivities, when there is a conflict with security... and I am not talking necessarily about terrorism here either, there should be no question. There has been at least one reported incident where someone has used such anonymity for illegal use, and there will be again no doubt.

To me, it is no different to someone walking into a shop/bank, with crash helmet on.

Fork Me
16th April 2015, 15:38
Fork Me and the rest of the Politically Correct brigade

Grow up, disagreeing with you on this does not make me a part if any brigade, let alone a politically correct one.

Dordie
16th April 2015, 15:57
Grow up, disagreeing with you on this does not make me a part if any brigade, let alone a politically correct one.

Wanna bet?

Plutonium
18th April 2015, 07:56
One of the issues in my mind, is the idea that this level of "modesty" is not even - as far as I know, if someone could correct me I would appreciate it - really required within the religion. I have no issue with head-scarves, many white/english non-muslims cover up part of their face, but when someone is fully covered up, bollocks to cultural sensitivities, when there is a conflict with security... and I am not talking necessarily about terrorism here either, there should be no question. There has been at least one reported incident where someone has used such anonymity for illegal use, and there will be again no doubt.

To me, it is no different to someone walking into a shop/bank, with crash helmet on.

You're right, the Koran does not require the face to be covered. It merely says that women should dress modestly.

The standard conservative Muslim dress for women covers every part of their body, including their hair, except for their face and hands. I don't particularly like it, but it doesn't force women to cover their face. St Paul said that hair is the glory of the woman, so I think it is a pity that Muslim women are forced to cover their hair; nevertheless I would not want to ban headscarves. However, forcing women to cover their faces crosses a line into dehumanisation and oppression, and should be banned, IMO.

Bill. MC
18th April 2015, 15:43
The last time I visited in Ealing I got mugged by two Black guys.